Tras haber creado mi anterior blog cecilmundo varias personas, muchos de ellos mis alumnos, me sugirieron que creara una secciòn dentro de cecilmundo para publicar mis obras de docencia de idiomas. Dado que la cantidad de documentos de explicaciones, ejercicios y exàmenes de inglès son muy numerosos porque tengo màs de 30 años del ejercicio de la docencia, preferì estrenar blog con mis alumnos a como ellos realmente merecen. En este blog planetcecil no solo iràn mis documentos didàcticos de inglès, sino tambièn la producciòn literaria de varios alumnos que se destacan en las letras. Tambièn darè oportunidad a aquellos que tienen excelentes obras pero que no han logrado publicarlas ya que en mi paìs Nicaragua todo se mueve por la marrana polìtica, y si una no pertenece a determinado partido no verà jamàs publicado su opus. Tambièn tenemos la desgracia de contar con seudoeditores quienes al no conocer verdaderamente de literatura se convierten en mercenarios de la imprenta solo para llenarse ellos mismo de dinero y fama a costillas de los escritores. Todos aquellos que deseen participar en este blog, denlo de antemano por suyo. Aunque lleve mi nombre en un arranque de egolatrìa, yo soy sencillamente vuestra servidora.Cecilia

Las alas de la educación

Las alas de la educación
La educación es un viaje sin final.

La lección de física

La lección de física
Casi aprendida

martes, 23 de julio de 2013

ARISTOTELES LEVALLOIS´RED BARON

Legendary Pilot of World War I: The Red Baron, from Historyarte
Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (2 May 1892 – 21 April 1918), also widely known as the Red Baron, was a German fighter pilot  with the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte ) during World War I . He is considered the top ace  of that war, being officially credited with 80 air combat  victories.Originally a cavalryman, Richthofen transferred to the Air Service in 1915, becoming one of the first members of Jasta 2  in 1916. He quickly distinguished himself as a fighter pilot, and during 1917 became leader of Jasta 11  and then the larger unit Jagdgeschwader 1  (better known as the "Flying Circus"). By 1918, he was regarded as a national hero in Germany, and was very well known by the other side.
Richthofen was shot down and killed near Amiens  on 21 April 1918. There has been considerable discussion and debate regarding aspects of his career, especially the circumstances of his death. He remains perhaps the most widely known fighter pilot of all time, and has been the subject of many books, films and other media . Richthofen was fatally wounded just after 11:00 am on 21 April 1918, while flying over Morlancourt  Ridge, near the Somme River .
At the time, the Baron had been pursuing (at very low altitude) a Sopwith Camel  piloted by a novice Canadian pilot, Lieutenant Wilfrid "Wop" May  of No. 209 Squadron , Royal Air Force.[43]  In turn, the Baron was spotted and briefly attacked by a Camel piloted by a school friend (and flight commander) of May's, Canadian Captain Arthur "Roy" Brown , who had to dive steeply at very high speed to intervene, and then had to climb steeply to avoid hitting the groundRichthofen turned to avoid this attack, and then resumed his pursuit of May. It was almost certainly during this final stage in his pursuit of May that Richthofen was hit by a single .303  bullet, which caused such severe damage to his heart and lungs that it must have produced a very speedy death. In the last seconds of his life, he managed to make a hasty but controlled landing in a field on a hill near the Bray-Corbie road, just north of the village of Vaux-sur-Somme , in a sector controlled by the Australian Imperial Force  (AIF). One witness, Gunner George Ridgway, stated that when he and other Australian soldiers reached the aircraft, Richthofen was still alive but died moments later.[45]  Another eye witness, Sergeant Ted Smout  of the Australian Medical Corps , reported that Richthofen's last word was "kaputt".
His Fokker was not badly damaged by the landing, but it was soon taken apart by souvenir hunters.No. 3 Squadron , Australian Flying Corps , as the nearest Allied air unit, assumed responsibility for the Baron's remains.
In 2009, Richthofen's death certificate  was found in the archives in Ostrów Wielkopolski , Poland. Richthofen had briefly been stationed in Ostrów—which was part of Germany until the end of World War I—before going to war. The document, which is a one-page, handwritten form in a 1918 registry book of deaths, misspells Richthofen's name as "Richthoven" and simply states that he has "died 21 April 1918, from wounds sustained in combat.